Overlooking Plein Air

Easton, MD has a Plein Air painting event that is considered one of the best in the country. People paint around the area for a week and significant prizes are awarded. On the Saturday of Plein Air week, activities center on Harrison Street. This painter was smart to put down a piece of cardboard to keep his feet off the hot asphalt.

About six years ago Laura had the idea to get a small group of women together to have lunch at one of the restaurants on Harrison Street and people watch. The first years we had lunch on the porch of Masons. Two years ago the restaurant closed so the following year we had lunch on the porch of The Bartlett Pear. People on the street wondered who we were to have such a great viewing location. Some asked if we were judges. We just nodded.

Bartlett Pear is now on the market and its restaurant is closed. Laura, being the master negotiator, rented the porch for us and we collaborated what each of us would bring for lunch. We started with cheese, crackers and fruit. Betty Ann brought two large pitchers of white Sangria. That was followed by a chilled carrot soup. Then a tomato filled with chicken salad. A mini-croissant completed the main course. Dessert was cookies I’d bought at the St. Michaels Farmers Market that morning and cut into quarters.

We had extra sangria so we shared it with the band. The left over cookies were given to the Bartlett Pear owner’s daughter to share with her friends. While we were still on the porch, artists would occasionally make their way up the stairs to get out of the sun and have a glass of sangria.

One of the signatures of Plein Air is that it seems to occur during the hottest week of July. This year was no exception. Temps in the high 90’s with Eastern Shore humidity. We had an occasional breeze on the Pear porch, but most of us were wearing as little clothing as possible that women of a certain age can get away with. After lunch we walked the streets for a little while and then took shelter in the air-conditioned Armory and the Art Museum where juried participant’s work was displayed and for sale.

I often think the palettes should be framed and sold.

By mid-afternoon we had sweltered long enough and went home. I took the remaining sangria fruit thinking I would cook it up, strain it and use the juice to make jelly.  I never want to waste anything. The juice is in the fridge and I will make Plein Air jelly tomorrow. There were so many kinds of fruit in the sangria that there won’t be one dominant flavor. I’ll see what kind of liquor I have in the cupboard that I could add to make a palate focal point. Peach schapps? Cassis? Port wine? Cointreau? I’ll let you know how it turns out. If it doesn’t jell, we can eat it over vanilla ice cream.

 

Market Paella

Last weekend the husband and I helped set up at the Farmer’s Market again. We’d had lots of rainy Saturdays, but Memorial Day Saturday had blue skies and sun. I was able to take lots of photos that I can use in the weekly MailChimp market reminder.

The chef demo was a market paella (vegetarian) made by Taylor Hale. He walked around to the vendors and collected vegetables. He made the stock from vegetable leaves and spent time prepping the veggies. The only things he brought with him were rice, spices and water.

The kettle in the back left of the photo above is the stock he made on site from vegetable leaves. I was inspired by this as I often think I’m going to use the leaves I cut from my Hakuri turnips or beets, etc. but they usually go into the compost. Now I am throwing all those things in the stock pot with some onions and maybe some leftover vegetables in the fridge and making vegetable stock.

 

I asked Taylor about what kind of rice he used and I took a photo of the bag. It’s available on Amazon. He said Bomba was an alternative paella rice. His seasoning is his own concoction. It’s called Mo’ Spanish and is available on his website as is the recipe for the green sauce he added to the samples being handed out. I bought some Mo’ Spanish and made some paella with Arborio rice which was the closest I could come with what I had in the pantry. Later in the week I made a double batch of hummus (1 can chickpeas and 1 can Cannellini beans) and used some Mo’ Spanish. The hummus was terrific.

Later in the week I made a double batch of hummus (1 can chickpeas and 1 can Cannellini beans) and used some Mo’ Spanish. The hummus was terrific and a lovely protein substitute for meat.

The market is a welcoming place for neighbors and friends to meet. Dogs, and children of all ages, are welcome.

What’s Up

Saturday is the opening of the St. Michaels Farmers Market. The husband and I signed up to help with early set-up.  As a reward we get to be some of the bell ringers to open the first day of the market. I was a bell ringer last year, too. It was a chilly morning, hence all the layers.

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I’ve never helped with the market before, but it’s in a transitional phase and I want to do everything I can to help the market continue. I grow most of our green food, but supplement at the market.

I volunteered to keep the MailChimp mailing list and send out market reminders. The first one went out on Wednesday morning. I plan to take a lot of photos this year to add visual interest to the market reminders.

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Garden chores keep on. I’ve planted the dahlia roots I grew from seed last year. A week ago I planted the elephant ear tubers. I am hoping to get huge leaves so I can do more cement castings in late summer. The castings have been in the garage all winter and as soon as I get some time I’ll paint them.

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I also programed the drip irrigation systems and installed them. This year I did the programming while sitting on the garage stoop instead of doing it once I’d put them on the hose bibs.

irrigation sideways tweaked

That required me being on my back trying to read the directions and program at the same time. I’m embarrassed to admit that I did that several years before I figured out I could do it another way.  I tested one system that’s is my window boxes and it’s okay. I need to test the other, much larger, system and see if any fixes need to be made.

I’ve started some seeds inside the house but nothing is up yet. In the garden beds garlic, potatoes, arugula and turnips are sprouting. I’ve ordered Molokai Purple Sweet Potato (6 plants cost $18) and Ginger root but they haven’t arrived yet. Those sweet potatoes are supposed to be full of healthy stuff since they’re purple and Japanese who eat them live to be 120. Maybe $18 is cheap.

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I got a new computer Wednesday and my genius tech guy is coming today to transfer files and make sure all is well. I already have the latest Microsoft operating system so that won’t be a learning curve. But for someone of the generation who bought one refrigerator and one washer and dryer and had them last for thirty years, the notion of having to replace electronics frequently is hard to get my head around.

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I started a singing class two weeks ago. It was advertised in the ALL (Adventures in Lifelong Learning) and both my yoga instructor, Paulette Florio, and I read the summary of the class as being for people who wanted to sing but didn’t think they could. At the first class it turned out that most of the people had some background in singing. They’d sung with local choral arts groups, some professionally. All felt their voices had changed as they got older. Heck, I just wanted to see IF I HAD A VOICE. Paulette and I spent that first class trying not to laugh at ourselves. And the blurb in the ALL brochure didn’t say what we thought it did. Wishful thinking on our part.

However, I am learning things about breathing, where you tongue goes in your mouth, the mechanics of the body parts that produce voice, etc. so I think I’ll try and stick it out for awhile. If I don’t it wouldn’t be the first time I signed up for a class and decided it wasn’t for me. It would free up some time for writing and working in the garden.

Women Who Do Too Much

My friend, Diane Marquette, emailed me after I told her I’d forgotten to do something important. This is what she said…

” ‘Women Who Still Do Too Much,’ like ourselves, cannot keep all the plates spinning all the time. Sometimes stuff’s gonna wobble and break. That’s why there’s glue in the junk drawer.

I appreciated the “still” in what she said. I am trying hard to pare down my commitments so I have more time to write. There are a few more things to do for the Eastern Shore Writers Association and the Bay to Ocean Conference, but then more of my time will be my own. Of course, now that spring is here, the garden is calling…but I am writing every day and the plot for the third book in the Caribbean series is pulling together. I’m thinking about starting to post some excepts from the first book in the series.

Saturday we drove to Philadelphia to take our granddaughter to dinner. She was in town for an Occupational Therapy conference. She lives on the west coast and doesn’t get east very often, so we really enjoyed catching up. I love that we have the same chin! She’s a lovely young woman and we couldn’t be prouder grandparents.

Sunday afternoon I attended a meeting for volunteers at the St. Michaels Farmer’s Market. It’s an important institution in our community for those of us who care about where  are food comes from and how it’s grown or raised. I am excited to see how there can be more linkage between the St. Michaels Community Garden (one of my volunteer activities) and the Farmers Market. Many of us who grow most of our own produce supplement at the Farmers Market. I am stumped by summer squash. My zucchinis and yellow squash never survive squash borers.

Veggie signs went up on Talbot Street this weekend. This is a fun fundraiser for the Farmers Market.Other organizations do similar fund raisers. Before Valentine’s Day we have Hearts on Talbot, we have Jack Russel dog signs before the Jack Russel races at Perry Cabin, and silver stars before Christmas in St. Michaels.

 

There’s always something going on in this wonderful small town on Maryland’s Eastern Shore.