What’s Up

Saturday is the opening of the St. Michaels Farmers Market. The husband and I signed up to help with early set-up.  As a reward we get to be some of the bell ringers to open the first day of the market. I was a bell ringer last year, too. It was a chilly morning, hence all the layers.

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I’ve never helped with the market before, but it’s in a transitional phase and I want to do everything I can to help the market continue. I grow most of our green food, but supplement at the market.

I volunteered to keep the MailChimp mailing list and send out market reminders. The first one went out on Wednesday morning. I plan to take a lot of photos this year to add visual interest to the market reminders.

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Garden chores keep on. I’ve planted the dahlia roots I grew from seed last year. A week ago I planted the elephant ear tubers. I am hoping to get huge leaves so I can do more cement castings in late summer. The castings have been in the garage all winter and as soon as I get some time I’ll paint them.

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I also programed the drip irrigation systems and installed them. This year I did the programming while sitting on the garage stoop instead of doing it once I’d put them on the hose bibs.

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That required me being on my back trying to read the directions and program at the same time. I’m embarrassed to admit that I did that several years before I figured out I could do it another way.  I tested one system that’s is my window boxes and it’s okay. I need to test the other, much larger, system and see if any fixes need to be made.

I’ve started some seeds inside the house but nothing is up yet. In the garden beds garlic, potatoes, arugula and turnips are sprouting. I’ve ordered Molokai Purple Sweet Potato (6 plants cost $18) and Ginger root but they haven’t arrived yet. Those sweet potatoes are supposed to be full of healthy stuff since they’re purple and Japanese who eat them live to be 120. Maybe $18 is cheap.

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I got a new computer Wednesday and my genius tech guy is coming today to transfer files and make sure all is well. I already have the latest Microsoft operating system so that won’t be a learning curve. But for someone of the generation who bought one refrigerator and one washer and dryer and had them last for thirty years, the notion of having to replace electronics frequently is hard to get my head around.

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I started a singing class two weeks ago. It was advertised in the ALL (Adventures in Lifelong Learning) and both my yoga instructor, Paulette Florio, and I read the summary of the class as being for people who wanted to sing but didn’t think they could. At the first class it turned out that most of the people had some background in singing. They’d sung with local choral arts groups, some professionally. All felt their voices had changed as they got older. Heck, I just wanted to see IF I HAD A VOICE. Paulette and I spent that first class trying not to laugh at ourselves. And the blurb in the ALL brochure didn’t say what we thought it did. Wishful thinking on our part.

However, I am learning things about breathing, where you tongue goes in your mouth, the mechanics of the body parts that produce voice, etc. so I think I’ll try and stick it out for awhile. If I don’t it wouldn’t be the first time I signed up for a class and decided it wasn’t for me. It would free up some time for writing and working in the garden.

These Boots Aren’t Made for Walking

White work boots are iconic for Eastern Shore watermen. These boots are at the Chesapeake Maritime Museum as a photo op. You stand behind on a step and put your legs into the boots while someone snaps your photo.

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They reminded me think of boots I recently bought.

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I’d bought a pair of tall boots from Tractor Supply a couple of years ago, but the bottom seams began to leak. I tried an epoxy fix which worked for a while, then epoxy with a mummy wrapping of cammo duct tape. They still leaked. I needed more substantial boots. I had a pair of Sloggers slip-ons that I really liked, but they didn’t work when we had standing water in the back yard and I needed to get to the compost bins.

I’d been in Baltimore for a dental appointment and wasn’t that far from Valley View Farms. It’s where I used to buy most of my plants when we lived on the Western Shore. I love that place. Anyway, I needed a size 10 and there was only one pair of tall boots in that size. I’d brought a pair of socks so I could try them on. I stuck one foot in and the size seemed fine. But I thought I should really try them both on just to make sure. I didn’t want to have to drive two hours back to return them.

I had just taken the photo above when I realized the boots were clipped together. I now had both feet in and short of falling over and removing them, I couldn’t figure out how to get them off. I debated about calling out for help, “boot removal needed in shoe department.”

Making sure no one was around,  I kangaroo hopped to a place on the wall where I could lean and managed to extricate one foot, then the other. Clipped together boots are not made for walking!

Two days later the Green Thumb group of the St. Michaels Woman’s Club held its annual garden tour. It was a nice day so I didn’t wear my chicken boots. This year one of the gardens we visited was the Children’s Garden in Idlewild Park. I didn’t even know it was there. If you haven’t visited it, it’s wonderful. It includes a maze in the shape of an oyster with a pearl fountain at it’s center. The concrete edging the maze has animal and bird foot prints.

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Docents visited the gardens the day before the tour so we could see them. We also saw the wonderful gardens at the historical society and three different gardens at the Maritime Museum in St. Michaels. Usually we do member’s gardens, but decided do something different this year.

I was a docent at the Rohman’s urban homestead in Easton. Their lot is 1/5th of an acre and the house sits on half of it. They grow an abundance of fruits and vegetables and have chickens, rabbits, and honey bees. They espalier, grow on wire supports, anything to give them a more productive garden in their raised beds. It’s an impressive undertaking.

The friends I have made in the Woman’s Club are a joy in my life. Marcel Proust said, “Let us be grateful to the people who make us happy; they are the charming gardeners who make our souls blossom.” I am blooming.

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One Thing Leads to Another

You know how this goes. You want to get a project finished, but before you can really start there are other things that have to be done.

The project: fill the window boxes in the front of the house.

Last Thursday the Green Thumb Garden group of the St. Michaels Woman’s Club took a bus trip to London Town in Edgewater, MD. We had the first day with no rain in 20 days. After touring Londontown and its beautiful, soggy gardens we boarded the bus to Homestead Gardens in Davidsonville, MD. We were there to shop! The bus had loads of room underneath and Homestead Gardens has a fabulous selection of plants for my window boxes. Oh, and llamas and alpacas.

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I wanted to find a replacement Golden Showers rose. It’s a pillar rose and the one I have is ten years old and showing its age. Three years ago I ordered another one from Wayside Gardens to put in as a replacement. It has not done well. And the three Fairy roses I ordered from Wayside the same year have never bloomed! I am not ordering plants from Wayside again anytime soon.

Homestead was very low on climbing roses and did not stock Golden Showers. I bought a pink climber to try. I also was in the market for annuals to fill the window boxes on the front of the house. Homestead had Sunpatiens – a new cultivar of New Guinea impatiens that does well in the sun. So I bought 15 which is what I need for the five window boxes. I fill in with some other things – so I bought more plants.

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Before I began on the window boxes I needed to plant that rose. I started to dig a hole but the ground was so wet that I abandoned that and will try again when things have dried out. See all those maple tree helicopters. That’s another project with the blower, but requires the fliers to be dry.

Now I had the plants, but before I could plant the window boxes I had to make sure the drip irrigation system was working. That required a trip to the store for new 9V batteries. I have two drip irrigation systems. One for the window boxes and one for the raised veggie beds. The systems have timers which need to be set for day, time of irrigation and number of minutes. But before you can do that you have to set the time and day you are setting up the system. All this is done using five little buttons. Something has to be blinking before you can program it. Since I do this once a year I never can remember the sequence. Even with the instructions it’s daunting. However this year I resolved to program the darn things before I put them on the hose. Every year in the past I’ve installed them and then ended up lying on my back trying to figure it out. Result: lots of cursing and plants getting watered at strange times.

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So now the gizmo is programed and ready to be attached to the hose. It’s really windy today, so I’ll wait until tomorrow. Then I need to turn it on and see if there are any leaks in the system. Then I can  plant my window boxes. The weather forecast is for cold night temps tonight. I don’t want to put the boxes out and have them blasted. Tomorrow might be a good day. Those window boxes will be in by the end of May.

I still have to program the system for the raised veggie beds and test it. I know there is a major leak in one of the big hoses. Damn squirrels chewed it last fall. But, of course, I didn’t put a piece of tape around it so have to turn on the system and be prepared to get wet while I hunt for the leak. Like I said, one thing leads to another. But I am going to get the system set up before I attach it to the hose outlet. I do occasionally learn to work smarter.

Note: The bunnies have found my raised veggie beds. The BB gun is coming out of the closet.

 

Merrily We Roll Along Toward Fall Gardening

Theater

Our area is rich in talent. On Sunday, Laura, my husband and I went to the Oxford Community Center to see Merrily We Roll Along. We went mostly because Laura’s nephew, Sam Stenecker was the lead in the show. And Tally Wilford was the director. Tally manned the light boards for the Avalon production of our play, The Santa Diaries. It’s always fun to see people you know in a show, and I don’t know why I am always stunned at the local talent.

Merrily We Roll Along is a musical with music and lyrics by Stephen Sondheim. The book is by George Furth. I have to say I’m not a huge Sondheim fan. I don’t find myself humming the melodies, but the lyrics are another matter. The songs and the play made us think about the choices we make in life and the results. The cast was terrific with some exceptional voices. It has been so interesting to watch Laura’s nephew, Sam, mature as a performer. He’s grown from a gangly adolescent into an actor with presence and leading man looks. His acting is top notch and his voice superb.

Directory Tally Wilford has had theater in his blood since he was a kid. At sixteen he founded the Underground Actors. He and his group have been producing plays ever since.

The play starts in 1976 with the characters in middle age at the peak of their careers and moves backwards in time to 1973, 1968 and 1966. We see the choices the characters make which don’t lead them to happier lives. Definitely a play to discuss at dinner after… which we did by enjoying a corner booth at Scossa in Easton. Laura got an order of veal meatballs to take home to her hubby who was getting in later that night from a flight.

Tomatoes That Won’t Quit

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I pulled out the eight Roma tomato plants out of my bed at the St. Michaels Community Garden. Enough is enough. I still have a couple of plants at home, but they are history this weekend. In the meantime I continue to can tomato sauce and gift it to friends.

 

Gardening Rolls Along

IMG_0352Fall plants go in tomorrow. Chard, cabbage, kale, cauliflower, and lettuce. I’ve also planted some seeds, but am hedging my bets with nursery starts. The nights are getting cooler and seed germination gets tricky.