Six on Saturday – Dragging in the Garden – July 20, 2019

It’s been really hot. Temps in the high 90’s and today predicted to be 100 with a heat index of 115 Farenheit. And no rain in sight so I am dragging hoses around the yard trying to keep my gardens watered until we get some rain.

  1. I must admit I was tempted to take a seat on the bench this morning and cool off.IMG_9194

2.  Rudbeckia are blooming — and taking over this bed. In the fall I need to seriously thin this patch.

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3. Limelight hydrangea with an Arabella clematis that just keeps blooming.

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4. The hoops removed from rotted half wine barrels have been repurposed into a sculpture perched on the stump of a clump of river birch removed last year. The heaps of chips are from the huge load we got a week ago. They were not great chips as they had alot of leaves in them. Next time I’ll remember to get them earlier in the season before the trees leaf out.

I got them all moved around the yard but didn’t have the energy to spread them.  But we can pull the car closer to the garage now.  I can do a little spreading early each morning. The photo was post watering.

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5. I moved this crepe myrtle to another part of the yard several years ago. Apparently I didn’t get all the roots as it is now putting on a show with the other crepe myrtles that have begun blooming. Once established crepe myrtles don’t seem to mind the hot humid weather on the Eastern Shore.

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6. A baby pumpkin. Why do I keep doing planting squash that just provide a banquet for borers? There is probably a therapy group for people like me. Borers Anonymous anyone?

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That’s my quick six for this week, a meme started by The Propogator, a UK gardener. I learn something every week from the participating gardeners. This is the link to the rules if you’d like to join in. #lovemygarden

 

 

Six on Saturday – Hot, Hot, Hot – June 29, 2019

Summer temperatures are finally here. In the mid-nineties most days. No rain for a week but I’m not complaining…yet. I’ve been pressure washing the house a side a day with the  loan of equipment from my neighbor. I’m wet by the time I finish, but with the heat I don’t mind. There’s lots of color in the garden this time of year and I enjoy my early morning walk to check on everything. Saw the first Japanese beetle last week so will start carrying a container of soapy water on my walks around the garden to drown them in.  Easier than squishing the beetles.

  1. This clematis just keeps blooming when the others have stopped.  I lost the tag for this one when the lattice was replace but I thought it was Arabella. When I googled clematis Arabella it said it was non-vining. This doesn’t get very tall but I have tucked it into the lattice and it seems happy. I’m sticking with Arabella.

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2. The Vitex tree (aka Chaste tree) at the end of the driveway is now in full bloom. I didn’t get around to cutting it back this spring so it is now taller than I want it to be. It blooms on new wood so will need to be trimmed aggressively next spring.

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3. I planted a packet of zinnia seeds that I found in my seed box. This first bloom has wonky petals but I love the color.  Some other zinnias I planted from seed are too tall and get floppy. Next year I’ll pay more attention to plant height but I will certainly save seed from this beauty.

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4. Getting more sun with last year’s removal of a river birch has benefited this clump of purple coneflower.

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5. I have shasta daisies several places in the garden. They are descendents of a clump at the house when we moved here 13 years ago. There wasn’t much here. The daisies were planted in a small circle in the middle of the backyard ringed with a variety of odd stones the family must have brought home from trips.

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6. Coreopsis Moonbeam spreads and I now have it multiple places in the garden and in some pots. If sheared back by a third, it will bloom again late summer and fall. Wikipedia tells me: “Coreopsis verticillata is a North American species of tickseed in the sunflower family.” I am a sucker for anything with yellow flowers. I love the pop in shaded parts of my garden.

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That’s six from my hot summer garden. #lovemygarden. The SoS meme was started by The Propogator, a UK gardener.  This is the link to the rules if you’d like to join in.

Six on Saturday – Summer into Fall

Our six week drought ended with a week of rain. We were lucky because we didn’t get flooding like some other areas nearby. The parched soil drank in the water, and all the plants perked up. The grass could be seen getting greener by the hour.

1. The things blooming now in my garden remind me that fall is just around the corner. Colorful crepe myrtles adorn my yard and neighborhood. Mine are white, a deep pink and a smaller purple. I bought the white and purple, but the pink were plants that someone had put out for the trash. So I snagged them. I really love the exfoliating bark. The old bark reminds of the black snake skins I used to find in our barn back in Harford County on the Western shore.

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2. A friend gave me a small cutting of a Rose of Sharon (Hibiscus syriacus) that came from her father’s garden. I didn’t realize Rose of Sharon was in the Hibiscus family. This plant is tucked back in a shaded corner of the garden and would like more sun, but it’s where there was an available spot. The flowers are lovely. In my Google search several places noted that these could be used as container plants. I might try that and get this beauty into the sun.

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3. I am seeing some Japanese beetles, so I put a little dishwashing detergent in some water and flicked them into it to drown. The only reason I can think that this SunPatiens is looking so sick is that one day — when it was so hot — I poured the detergent water on that end of the window box. Won’t do that again! All the other plants look fine. What I really need to do is go to the garden center where I bought the bedding plants and see if I can replace the sick one.

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4. The hyacinth bean vines are just beginning to flower. The seeds were saved from plants a friend gave me. She passed away two years ago, but is remembered in my garden. The hose was put away later, but I forgot to go out for another photo. It seems there are always spots in my garden that make everyone know a real person, with a real life, lives here. I was inside making tomato sauce from tomatoes grown in my bed at the Community Garden.

I just realized looking at this photo that I have a replacement for the sick SunPatien mentioned in #3. It’s in a pot at the lower left of this picture. I now remember I had a couple left over from the flat I bought.

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5. The Limelight hydrangea has started to flower. And the Arabella clematis, which has been blooming since spring, is now weaving its way through to the other side of the lattice.

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6.  Butterfly weed (Asclepias tuberosa) is a milkweed native and mine are now setting seed pods. I haven’t seen any Monarch caterpillars, however. Monarchs cannot survive without milkweed as their caterpillars only eat milkweed plants, and monarch butterflies need milkweed to lay their eggs. Google tells me that Monarch butterfly populations have dropped more than 90% in the last twenty years because of a loss of host plants, so growing milkweed plants is very important for future of monarchs. I’m trying to do my bit. These plants don’t mind some drought once established, so I will plant some of the seeds when they are ready. I wouldn’t mind having a whole bed of these. They would be a nice complement in front of the yellow rudbeckia.

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That’s my six on Saturday, a meme started by The Propogator, a UK gardener. This is the link to the rules if you’d like to join in.

 

Six on Saturday – June 23, 2018

  1. I begin with one of my concrete leaf castings in an elevated box hanging on a fence. I like the color with the nasturtium blooms and the soft yellows on the weathered fence. I planted seeds of ‘Peach Melba’ in the box in the early spring. I suspect bought this variety because of the name. I never pass on dessert.

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2.  Verbena Boniarensis is the tall purple flower. I started out five years ago with one plant leftover from the Woman’s Club annual plant sale. Now it is seeding all over the garden, living up to its reputation as invasive. The blooming lily is one someone gave me.  Only two blooming stalks survived the rabbits this spring. The small pops of red are Rose Campion (Lychnis coronaria).

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3. The day lilies are starting to bloom. I love the green throat on this one. Garden porn.

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4. Another day lily that appears darker in reality. It’s prettier in the photo than in real life. I like the lighter colored lilies so a large patch of this may be relegated to the compost.

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5. This clematis (on a trellis that obviously did not get scrubbed with bleach this spring) is Arabella. It bloomed all last summer and twined into the Limelight hydrangea on the other side of the lattice. A very happy combination. I just found the plastic tag that came with this clematis and its claim that it blooms June through September were accurate.

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6. While cleaning the garage this spring I found some white sweet potatoes that I bought last fall. We didn’t like them so much so there were still quite a few in the cardboard box. I threw them in the compost but they seem determined to survive, and are no doubt growing white sweet potatoes in the compost bin. I may leave them to freeze over the winter. We much prefer the orange variety. Observe the very healthy maple seedlings at the bottom of the photo. I took the photo and them pulled them out.

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That’s my Six on Saturday for this week. The meme was started by The Propogator, a UK gardener. This is the link to the rules if you’d like to join in.