Six on Saturday: June 16, 2018 – still too much to do…

The to-do list keeps growing, but the good news is that the gardens have dried out enough to be able to do some work. I’m realizing that while sharing my gardens with other Six on Saturday gardeners, the real benefit is for me. The photos, often close-ups, make me stop and  take the time to look more closely at my plants. I see things I would otherwise miss.

  1. A friend gave me some  hydrangea stems. These are a week old. The trick is to dip the cut stems in alum before putting them in the water. They last much longer. Alum is used in canning and can be found in the spice section of your grocery store.

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2.  Three years ago I bought a package deal of six different clematis. This vine struggled and bloomed for the first time this year. I think it is Pink Mink. The bird netting behind it was an idea a took from another Six on Saturday posting. I stapled it to the fence to give the vine something to climb on when they overreached the trellis.

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3.  My Jackmani clematis has moved with me three times in the last fifty years.  It is glorious this year. This is the backside of the latice — right by one of my compost bins. Maybe that’s why this vine is so happy. The front of the lattice, which I see from the house, looks good too, but the backside is even better.IMG_6533

4.  Tomatoes in pots are blooming and the Sungold has small fruits. The blue tarp in the background covers 6 cubic yards of mulch yet to be spread. Currently the gardens remind me of my children’s bedrooms when they were kids. Dirty laundry on the floor and beds unmade. The gardens will finally look dressed when the mulching is done, but there still is weeding to do before that happens. I wanted to get mulch before the local landscaping supplier ran out. I like “pine fines” but can’t get it anymore. This mulch is triple shredded hardwood. I mulch beds every two to three years with perhaps a line of mulch along the edges in the more visible areas in the off years. We always seem to have piles of something in our drive. The neighbors don’t complain. They know they are welcome to wander in the garden.

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5.  The shasta daisies are getting ready to bloom. This is the first one this summer. When we moved to this house there was one clump. Over the last twelve years they have been divided and moved multiple times and survive in very inhospitable conditions. This clump is in partial shade and never gets watered or fertilized, but the white punches needed drama into the shade.

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6. Daylilies are starting to bloom. I was going to post a photo of the Stella d’Oros but this photo was too lovely not to share. I have no idea of the variety or where it came from. I doubt I bought it.

 

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I hope you’ve enjoyed my Six on Saturday for this week. The meme was started by The Propogator, a UK gardener. It’s a great place for new ideas.  This is the link to the rules if you’d like to join in.

30 thoughts on “Six on Saturday: June 16, 2018 – still too much to do…

  1. Colorful post with that beautiful Jackmanii. Thanks for the tip about hydrangeas! I wonder of you use the white tubing for support as your tomatoes grow or does it serve another purpose?

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    • The white tubing is what electricians use. It’s cheap and it bends. The ends are put over rebar that I drove into the ground several feet. I put it in originally to grow vines on but always have a few indeterminate tomatoes that need tall supports. Why not use what’s already there, I thought. I am a lazy gardener.

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    • The original Jackmani was planted by my father in 1960. I brought a slip of it to my first house (first marriage) and then another slip to my second house (second marriage) and the third slip of the original plant to the house I now live in (still with husband #2 forty-four years later. So that original Jackmani has been with me for over fifty years.

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  2. Jackmani clematis was the standard of those types of clematis when we learned it in school. The others were just considered to be fancier hybrids. Our professors were not to impressed with some of the really garish clematis that were becoming more available back then.

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  3. The daylily is a beautiful color! I agree that there is still too much to do. Turn your back for a minute and there are weeds everywhere, the grass has grown two feet tall, the peonies are tumbling over, and on and on. What did we do all winter?!

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