It’s Just a Shed

We have a cute shed in our back yard. It was here when we bought the house. The husband built window boxes for it and in the summer they are full of ivy and geraniums although it’s a little forlorn in the fall and winter.

shed-5-20-12

Like most sheds, things get put in it and don’t come out. One of our goals this fall was to see what was in the corners, so we started taking things out some of which were donated to ReStore. We found three boxes of stuff that had been put in the shed when we moved here eleven years ago. I had wondered where those cast iron garden birds had gotten to.

With the shed almost emptied I saw an opportunity. This was the time to install drywall. It would protect the insulation that someone had installed. I didn’t plan to paint the drywall.

You have to understand that I have done a fair amount of drywall in my life. I helped install it in several rooms of our old house and I was the mudder. I still have the tools to prove it. But the last time I did drywall I told myself I was never doing drywall again. However, the passing of years meant I’d forgotten what a pain in the butt it can be. I’d also forgotten about digging drywall dust out of my nose.

My husband handed me the jigsaw you use the cut out the bits where the electric sockets are. I’m sure I would have gotten better with more practice, but after my first cut, I told myself – IT’S JUST A SHED and handed the jigsaw to him.

img_2068

And since it’s JUST A SHED I’m not going to spackle the seams and screw holes. I did begin to think about paint, however. Not to make it pretty, but to protect the drywall. We have two sheets of drywall to finish the job and they are standing in front of the space in the garage where I store paint. I’ll have to see if I have any partial cans that would do the job. Or I might go to Lowe’s and see what they have on the “oops – that’s not the right color” shelf. I am not paying $30 a gallon for paint for the inside of the shed where the drywall seams haven’t been taped or mudded.

Update: On the Saturday after Thanksgiving I went to Lowe’s but they didn’t have any “oops” paint. I went around the corner to ReStore and got a never-opened gallon of white paint for $7. Two days later all the dry wall is painted (two coats) and now we can install hangers for tools and sort what has to live in the shed. Those unmudded seams and screw holes are a little bothersome to my perfectionist self, but my mantra is…It’s Just a Shed!

 

 

My Green Thumb Eats Apple Cake

Last Friday was my monthly Green Thumb meeting. This is a group of gardeners who are members of the St. Michaels Woman’s Club. We get together for informational meetings, gardening workshops and road trips. This year I am co-chairing Green Thumb with my friend, Carol, who is terrific to work with. We have some different skill sets which makes for a good partnership. Plus, she always makes me laugh which is a very good thing.

The speaker at this month’s meeting was a local floral designer, Nancy Beatty. She was showing us ways to use greens to fill our outdoor containers and window boxes. And she also demonstrated some fantastic indoor arrangements. The tillandsia (air plant) in the arrangement below acts like a bow, but it’s a tropical plant that would not tolerate outdoor freezing temps. Replace the tillandsia with a red bow, however, and this arrangement would easily transition to the winter holidays.

img_1983

Nancy lives in the country and scavenges the fields and forests near her house for plant material and interesting embellishments. She found the turkey feathers and even the deer antlers used in the arrangement below. Nancy assured us that she gets permission from her neighbors to forage in their woods. The  scrolly things are copper wire.

img_1976

An outdoor container with the summer plants removed makes a perfect foundation for a tall, sculptural arrangement that will last through the winter. The plant materials are just stuck into the potting soil. The wrought iron tower is wrapped with honeysuckle vine Nancy found in the woods. When it’s fresh, she told us it doesn’t have to be soaked. A white pine cone garland drapes the edges of the pot. She showed us how to make them with only pine cones and wire.

img_1982

We always have refreshments at our meetings and women take turns being “hostesses.” At this meeting another friend, Diane, baked an Apple Cake that was outstanding. She said I could share the recipe on my blog. I think I sent my bundt  and angel food cake pans to the thrift shop. Seems every time I do something like that I need the darn things later.

This recipe might just make it to the Thanksgiving table.

img_1973

DIANE’S APPLE CAKE**

3 c. unsifted flour                  2 ½ tsp vanilla

2 ½ c. sugar                          1 tsp baking powder

1 c. oil                                    4 large apples, thinly sliced

4 eggs                                    2 tsp cinnamon

½ tsp salt                               4 T. Sugar

7 T. orange juice

  1. Lightly grease large angel food or bundt pan
  2. Beat together until smooth: flour, sugar, oil, eggs, salt, orange juice, vanilla & baking powder
  3. In a separate bowl, mix together apples, cinnamon and 4 T sugar
  4. Alternate layers of batter and apples in pan, beginning with batter and ending with apples
  5. Bake approximately 1 hour, 45 minutes at 350

** Also known as “Jewish Apple Cake”

img_1974

Wonder Woman and the Root Slayer

I just ordered a new garden shovel. It’s called a Root Slayer. I could have used it yesterday when I planted ten new azaleas.

root-slayer-with-root

I put the plants in a section of the garden that will now get more light because our neighbors removed a hedge of very tall Leland Cyprus. These azaleas will get dappled sunlight underneath some crepe myrtles, large old silver maples and river birch that I top every year so they don’t get too tall. Despite the fact that I didn’t need very big holes, they were hard to dig and there were lots of roots so I called in the husband.

After trying the first couple of holes with a shovel, my smart husband (who likes to work smarter not harder) got the pick ax out of the shed. I retrieved the big cutters from the garage and we started on hole number three. Those tools made the digging go faster but we could have used that Root Slayer.

root-slayer-2

When this tool showed up in an email ad this morning I knew I had to get it. It’s sharp on the bottom with cutting saw edges on the sides and enough of a flange to really get some foot leverage. I have other Radius tools that I like so I’ll let you know my critique on this one once I’ve used it.

I think I’ll go back to Eastern Shore Nurseries and get ten more azaleas – at 10 for $25 it’s a screaming deal. Now, please excuse me while I go change into my Wonder Woman duds.

Playing with your Food

We should all play with our food more. The wasabi warrior with his sword made me laugh and that’s something I could use more of the last few days.

Recipe in a Bottle

wasabi

This past weekend, two friends came to visit me, K and K. They both have had rough months – family tragedies and romantic trouble, not to mention that they both have demanding jobs that keep them almost constantly working. They made time to come see me, which I was thrilled about, but I could tell that what we all wanted and needed was a little bit of going back in time, to when we all spent a summer living in a house in our college town, working jobs with far less responsibility than we have now, having dance parties most nights in our living room, and never quite knowing where we were going to end up as “adults.”

We didn’t end up cooking together – too much, I think, like regular life – but we did end up at a sushi restaurant, because K mentioned how ravenous for sushi she…

View original post 219 more words

On the Writing Front

Lest you think Laura and I aren’t writing any more, we sort of aren’t. But that doesn’t mean we’re not working.

One of our scripts made the quarter finalist list on Scriptapalooza’s Screenplay Contest. We didn’t get to semi-finalist, but we keep trying. Sometime in December we are supposed to get some feedback about the script from the people who read it. That will be very helpful.

We also entered the same script in Final Draft’s Big Break contest and made the quarter finalist list. We didn’t get to semi-finalist in that contest either, but someone who was one of the judges for another category asked to see the whole script based on the log line. We sent it off that Friday afternoon (people read scripts over the weekend) but haven’t heard anything since.

We had been asked to write that movie script by a producer we know. It was on spec (we didn’t get paid to write it) and we liked it so much we registered it with the Screen Writers Guild of which Laura is a member. That means we own that script. We had another idea about how the script might be tweaked for TV and pitched it to the producer. He liked the idea and pitched it to some other producers. That project has generated some interest and now we have more research to do.

I can’t tell you any more about the project at this point, but if something begins to happen, I’ll let you know. It’s exciting, but we’ve been excited before so I haven’t bought that expensive bottle of celebration wine – yet.

Note: We thought our play, The Santa Diaries, was going to be produced by The St. Michaels Community Center this year, but despite a lot of hard work, they weren’t able to cast the male lead. Everyone else was in place.

Dancing Santa

They’ve got a year to find someone to play Will for 2017. They really want to do the show and we really want it to be back home in the community that inspired the original idea.